./devel/rscode, Reed Solomon error correction code library

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Branch: CURRENT, Version: 1.0, Package name: rscode-1.0, Maintainer: pkgsrc-users

The Reed-Solomon Code is an algebraic code belonging to the class of
BCH (Bose-Chaudry-Hocquehen) multiple burst correcting cyclic codes.
The Reed Solomon code operates on bytes of fixed length.

Given m parity bytes, a Reed-Solomon code can correct up to m byte
errors in known positions (erasures), or detect and correct up to m/2
byte errors in unknown positions.

This is an implementation of a Reed-Solomon code with 8 bit bytes, and
a configurable number of parity bytes. The maximum sequence length
(codeword) that can be generated is 255 bytes, including parity bytes.
In practice, shorter sequences are used.

The more general error-location algorithm is the Berlekamp-Massey
algorithm, which will locate up to four errors, by iteratively solving
for the error-locator polynomial. The Modified Berlekamp Massey
algorithm takes as initial conditions any known suspicious bytes
(erasure flags) which you may have (such as might be flagged by a
laser demodulator, or deduced from a failure in a cross-interleaved
block code row or column).

Once the location of errors is known, error correction is done using
the error-evaluator polynomial.


Master sites:

SHA1: b143b3794de81f73154e6452a213c8c85d501264
RMD160: 3659c9bd0e9aa000691e214ca07d8722e83811c4
Filesize: 9.293 KB

Version history: (Expand)


CVS history: (Expand)


   2015-11-03 04:29:40 by Alistair G. Crooks | Files touched by this commit (1995)
Log message:
Add SHA512 digests for distfiles for devel category

Issues found with existing distfiles:
	distfiles/eclipse-sourceBuild-srcIncluded-3.0.1.zip
	distfiles/fortran-utils-1.1.tar.gz
	distfiles/ivykis-0.39.tar.gz
	distfiles/enum-1.11.tar.gz
	distfiles/pvs-3.2-libraries.tgz
	distfiles/pvs-3.2-linux.tgz
	distfiles/pvs-3.2-solaris.tgz
	distfiles/pvs-3.2-system.tgz
No changes made to these distinfo files.

Otherwise, existing SHA1 digests verified and found to be the same on
the machine holding the existing distfiles (morden).  All existing
SHA1 digests retained for now as an audit trail.
   2013-01-11 00:52:36 by Joerg Sonnenberger | Files touched by this commit (1)
Log message:
Not MAKE_JOBS_SAFE.
   2012-10-31 12:19:55 by Aleksej Saushev | Files touched by this commit (1460)
Log message:
Drop superfluous PKG_DESTDIR_SUPPORT, "user-destdir" is default these days.
   2009-06-14 19:49:18 by Joerg Sonnenberger | Files touched by this commit (454)
Log message:
Remove @dirrm entries from PLISTs
   2008-03-03 18:45:38 by Johnny C. Lam | Files touched by this commit (119)
Log message:
Mechanical changes to add DESTDIR support to packages that install
their files via a custom do-install target.
   2007-04-18 20:09:36 by Joerg Sonnenberger | Files touched by this commit (1)
Log message:
Fix build with NO_MTREE.
   2007-04-15 23:39:52 by Alistair G. Crooks | Files touched by this commit (5) | Imported package
Log message:
Initial import of rscode-1.0 into the Packages Collection.

	The Reed-Solomon Code is an algebraic code belonging to the class of
	BCH (Bose-Chaudry-Hocquehen) multiple burst correcting cyclic codes.
	The Reed Solomon code operates on bytes of fixed length.

	Given m parity bytes, a Reed-Solomon code can correct up to m byte
	errors in known positions (erasures), or detect and correct up to m/2
	byte errors in unknown positions.

	This is an implementation of a Reed-Solomon code with 8 bit bytes, and
	a configurable number of parity bytes.  The maximum sequence length
	(codeword) that can be generated is 255 bytes, including parity bytes.
	In practice, shorter sequences are used.

	The more general error-location algorithm is the Berlekamp-Massey
	algorithm, which will locate up to four errors, by iteratively solving
	for the error-locator polynomial.  The Modified Berlekamp Massey
	algorithm takes as initial conditions any known suspicious bytes
	(erasure flags) which you may have (such as might be flagged by a
	laser demodulator, or deduced from a failure in a cross-interleaved
	block code row or column).

	Once the location of errors is known, error correction is done using
	the error-evaluator polynomial.