./math/p5-Math-Random-ISAAC, Perl interface to the ISAAC PRNG algorithm

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Branch: CURRENT, Version: 1.004nb5, Package name: p5-Math-Random-ISAAC-1.004nb5, Maintainer: pkgsrc-users

As with other Pseudo-Random Number Generator (PRNG) algorithms like the
Mersenne Twister (see Math::Random::MT), this algorithm is designed to
take some seed information and produce seemingly random results as output.

However, ISAAC (Indirection, Shift, Accumulate, Add, and Count) has
different goals than these commonly used algorithms. In particular, it's
really fast - on average, it requires only 18.75 machine cycles to generate
a 32-bit value. This makes it suitable for applications where a significant
amount of random data needs to be produced quickly, such solving using the
Monte Carlo method or for games.

The results are uniformly distributed, unbiased, and unpredictable unless
you know the seed. The algorithm was published by Bob Jenkins in the late
90s and despite the best efforts of many security researchers, no feasible
attacks have been found to date.


Required to run:
[lang/perl5] [math/p5-Math-Random-ISAAC-XS]

Required to build:
[devel/p5-Test-NoWarnings] [pkgtools/cwrappers]

Master sites: (Expand)

SHA1: 0d2e423559ed28d842e6907e3944d6c5b6f2705f
RMD160: 6a77fc0f57b92e9331c233a0f59d77acae7d8fe0
Filesize: 33.638 KB

Version history: (Expand)


CVS history: (Expand)


   2018-08-22 11:48:07 by Thomas Klausner | Files touched by this commit (3558)
Log message:
Recursive bump for perl5-5.28.0
   2017-06-05 16:25:36 by Ryo ONODERA | Files touched by this commit (2298)
Log message:
Recursive revbump from lang/perl5 5.26.0
   2016-06-08 21:25:20 by Thomas Klausner | Files touched by this commit (2236) | Package updated
Log message:
Bump PKGREVISION for perl-5.24.
   2015-11-04 00:33:46 by Alistair G. Crooks | Files touched by this commit (262)
Log message:
Add SHA512 digests for distfiles for math category

Problems found locating distfiles:
	Package dfftpack: missing distfile dfftpack-20001209.tar.gz
	Package eispack: missing distfile eispack-20001130.tar.gz
	Package fftpack: missing distfile fftpack-20001130.tar.gz
	Package linpack: missing distfile linpack-20010510.tar.gz
	Package minpack: missing distfile minpack-20001130.tar.gz
	Package odepack: missing distfile odepack-20001130.tar.gz
	Package py-networkx: missing distfile networkx-1.10.tar.gz
	Package py-sympy: missing distfile sympy-0.7.6.1.tar.gz
	Package quadpack: missing distfile quadpack-20001130.tar.gz

Otherwise, existing SHA1 digests verified and found to be the same on
the machine holding the existing distfiles (morden).  All existing
SHA1 digests retained for now as an audit trail.
   2015-06-12 12:52:19 by Thomas Klausner | Files touched by this commit (3152)
Log message:
Recursive PKGREVISION bump for all packages mentioning 'perl',
having a PKGNAME of p5-*, or depending such a package,
for perl-5.22.0.
   2014-05-30 01:38:20 by Thomas Klausner | Files touched by this commit (3049)
Log message:
Bump for perl-5.20.0.
Do it for all packages that
* mention perl, or
* have a directory name starting with p5-*, or
* depend on a package starting with p5-
like last time, for 5.18, where this didn't lead to complaints.
Let me know if you have any this time.
   2013-07-03 16:33:32 by Jens Rehsack | Files touched by this commit (3)
Log message:
Adding package for CPAN distribution Math-Random-ISAAC version 1.004 into
math/p5-Math-Random-ISAAC.

As with other Pseudo-Random Number Generator (PRNG) algorithms like the
Mersenne Twister (see Math::Random::MT), this algorithm is designed to
take some seed information and produce seemingly random results as output.

However, ISAAC (Indirection, Shift, Accumulate, Add, and Count) has
different goals than these commonly used algorithms. In particular, it's
really fast - on average, it requires only 18.75 machine cycles to generate
a 32-bit value. This makes it suitable for applications where a significant
amount of random data needs to be produced quickly, such solving using the
Monte Carlo method or for games.

The results are uniformly distributed, unbiased, and unpredictable unless
you know the seed. The algorithm was published by Bob Jenkins in the late
90s and despite the best efforts of many security researchers, no feasible
attacks have been found to date.