./wip/baler, Store data in bales and provide a TOC for direct access

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Branch: CURRENT, Version: 1.0, Package name: baler-1.0, Maintainer: jan.smydke

A simple tool which takes a set of files (e.g. encrypted compressed tar files
or just any files), stores them Byte by Byte into volumes, which I call bales
(just because the data are stored Byte by Byte similarly like hay is put into
bales), and generates a convenient table of contents (XML file) describing what
and where is stored in this balestack (i.e. the set of bales - the whole
archive). To get a particular file from the archive, we just look it up in the
XML table of contents, take the right bale (i.e. mount the right DVD) and
simply copy and paste the position and size to baler and that's all, folks!
Easy!

Typically I dedicate four DVDs as my archive media. Three of them contain bales
and the fourth one is used for the redundant data (so that a lost DVD can be
regenerated)

I prepare a few tar.xz.enc (i.e. encrypted compressed tarball) files and use
baler to create three bales and a table of contents. Then I use eor tool
(Exclusive OR generator for ordianary files) to generate the redundant data
from the three bales. Finally I just burn each bale plus the TOC file on the
corresponding DVD (multisession) and the redundant data plus TOC on the fourth
DVD. This process can be repeated with new balestacks until the DVDs are full.

This way the media are filled efficiently and the data are stored safely. When
I want a particular file I just open the TOC and see which of the DVDs I need.
And baler then gets the desired file from one or more bales very quickly.


Required to run:
[lang/ruby23-base]

Required to build:
[pkgtools/cwrappers]

Master sites:

SHA1: 89c3df907ca84e4cb4ee8d42c60c3676e42df6ac
RMD160: 8aa33d39e6f9018b3e9bda31446614ef1274c1f4
Filesize: 9.511 KB

Version history: (Expand)


CVS history: (Expand)


   2012-09-24 19:14:23 by Aleksej Saushev | Files touched by this commit (43)
Log message:
Drop superfluous PKG_DESTDIR_SUPPORT, "user-destdir" is default these days.
Mark packages that don't or might probably not have staged installation.
   2011-05-15 18:10:22 by Thomas Klausner | Files touched by this commit (1)
Log message:
Hardcode ruby interpreter into script, like we want it in pkgsrc.

   2011-03-27 12:05:52 by crocusino | Files touched by this commit (2)
Log message:
added comment to patch-aa
   2011-01-04 00:24:38 by Thomas Klausner | Files touched by this commit (1)
Log message:
Use lang/ruby/bl3.mk instead of DEPENDS.
Put LICENSE in proper section.
   2010-12-31 17:24:38 by crocusino | Files touched by this commit (5) | Imported package
Log message:
Import baler-1.0 as wip/baler.

A simple tool which takes a set of files (e.g. encrypted compressed tar files
or just any files), stores them Byte by Byte into volumes, which I call bales
(just because the data are stored Byte by Byte similarly like hay is put into
bales), and generates a convenient table of contents (XML file) describing what
and where is stored in this balestack (i.e. the set of bales - the whole
archive). To get a particular file from the archive, we just look it up in the
XML table of contents, take the right bale (i.e. mount the right DVD) and
simply copy and paste the position and size to baler and that's all, folks!
Easy!

Typically I dedicate four DVDs as my archive media. Three of them contain bales
and the fourth one is used for the redundant data (so that a lost DVD can be
regenerated)

I prepare a few tar.xz.enc (i.e. encrypted compressed tarball) files and use
baler to create three bales and a table of contents. Then I use eor tool
(Exclusive OR generator for ordianary files) to generate the redundant data
from the three bales. Finally I just burn each bale plus the TOC file on the
corresponding DVD (multisession) and the redundant data plus TOC on the fourth
DVD. This process can be repeated with new balestacks until the DVDs are full.

This way the media are filled efficiently and the data are stored safely. When
I want a particular file I just open the TOC and see which of the DVDs I need.
And baler then gets the desired file from one or more bales very quickly.