./wip/ntimed-git, Network Time Synchronization

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Branch: CURRENT, Version: 0.0nb20170821, Package name: ntimed-0.0nb20170821, Maintainer: pkgsrc-users

This is a preview/early-acces/alpha/buzzword-of-the-times release
of a new FOSS project written to gradually take over the world of
networked timekeeping.

The first step is a NTP protocol client daemon, 'Ntimed-client',
which will synchronize a systems clock to some set of NTP servers

If this catches on, support for slave servers, refclocks and other
protocols, such as PTP, can be added, subject to interest, skill,
time and money.

The overall architectural goals are the same as every other FOSS
project claims to follow: Simplicity, Quality, Security etc. etc.
but I tend to think that we stick a little bit more closely to
them.

This work is sponsored by Linux Foundation, partly in response to
the HeartBleed fiasco, and after studying the 300,000+ lines of
source-code in NTPD. I concluded that while it could be salvaged,
it would be more economical, much faster and far more efficient to
start from scratch.

Ntimed is the result.


Required to run:
[lang/python27]

Required to build:
[devel/git-base] [pkgtools/cwrappers]

Master sites:


Version history: (Expand)


CVS history: (Expand)


   2015-01-09 12:15:11 by Thomas Klausner | Files touched by this commit (4)
Log message:
Finish first version that compiles. Still open issues.
   2015-01-06 17:59:59 by Thomas Klausner | Files touched by this commit (4)
Log message:
Import ntimed-0.0nb20150106 as wip/ntimed-git.
Does not build, just a basic start. Problem reported
upstream at
https://github.com/bsdphk/Ntimed/issues/23

This is a preview/early-acces/alpha/buzzword-of-the-times release
of a new FOSS project written to gradually take over the world of
networked timekeeping.

The first step is a NTP protocol client daemon, 'Ntimed-client',
which will synchronize a systems clock to some set of NTP servers

If this catches on, support for slave servers, refclocks and other
protocols, such as PTP, can be added, subject to interest, skill,
time and money.

The overall architectural goals are the same as every other FOSS
project claims to follow: Simplicity, Quality, Security etc. etc.
but I tend to think that we stick a little bit more closely to
them.

This work is sponsored by Linux Foundation, partly in response to
the HeartBleed fiasco, and after studying the 300,000+ lines of
source-code in NTPD. I concluded that while it could be salvaged,
it would be more economical, much faster and far more efficient to
start from scratch.

Ntimed is the result.