./www/http-parser, Parser for HTTP messages written in C

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Branch: CURRENT, Version: 2.8.1, Package name: http-parser-2.8.1, Maintainer: schnoebe

An parser for HTTP messages written in C, parsing both requests
and responses. It is designed to be used in performance oriented
HTTP applications. It does not make any syscalls nor allocations,
it does not buffer data, it can be interrupted at anytime. Depending
on your architecture, it only requires about 40 bytes of data per
message stream (in a web server that is per connection).


Required to build:
[pkgtools/cwrappers]

Master sites:

SHA1: e980b680be6f31ea1f1a6d849d629248b5a9043e
RMD160: c2b861bdc2faa06c5a18bbf7c689205cee5e73fe
Filesize: 49.542 KB

Version history: (Expand)


CVS history: (Expand)


   2018-04-16 14:59:33 by Thomas Klausner | Files touched by this commit (2) | Package updated
Log message:
http-parser: update to 2.8.1.

Bugfix release.
   2018-02-11 17:29:28 by Thomas Klausner | Files touched by this commit (2) | Package updated
Log message:
http-parser: update to 2.8.0.

Three months of bugfixes.
   2016-10-19 14:51:17 by Thomas Klausner | Files touched by this commit (2) | Package updated
Log message:
Updated http-parser to 2.7.1.

Three months of development, no concise summary found.
   2016-08-25 20:30:33 by Jonathan Perkin | Files touched by this commit (4) | Package updated
Log message:
Use libtool for the build and install.  Fixes various issues with the
package which meant it only worked on NetBSD.  Bump PKGREVISION.
   2016-06-09 08:23:41 by Thomas Klausner | Files touched by this commit (38)
Log message:
Fix HOMEPAGE to be copy'n'pastable.
   2016-05-29 16:17:48 by Thomas Klausner | Files touched by this commit (3)
Log message:
Simplify by using more of the github framework.
   2016-05-29 01:09:30 by Eric Schnoebelen | Files touched by this commit (6)
Log message:
Add www/http-parser 2.7.0.

An parser for HTTP messages written in C, parsing both requests
and responses. It is designed to be used in performance oriented
HTTP applications. It does not make any syscalls nor allocations,
it does not buffer data, it can be interrupted at anytime. Depending
on your architecture, it only requires about 40 bytes of data per
message stream (in a web server that is per connection).