./wip/lrslib, Enumerate vertices and extreme rays of a convex polyhedron

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Branch: CURRENT, Version: 4.3, Package name: lrslib-4.3, Maintainer: jihbed.research

A convex polyhedron is the set of points satisfying a finite family of linear
inequalities.The study of the vertices and extreme rays of such systems is
important and useful in e.g. mathematics and optimization. In a dual
interpretation, finding the vertices of a (bounded) polyhedron is equivalent to
finding the convex hull (bounding inequalities) of an (arbitrary dimensional)
set of points. Lrs (lexicographic reverse search) has two important features
that can be very important for certain applications: it works in exact
arithmetic, and it consumes memory proportional to the input, no matter how
large the output is.


Required to run:
[devel/gmp]

Required to build:
[pkgtools/cwrappers]

Master sites:


Version history: (Expand)


CVS history: (Expand)


   2012-10-03 11:10:35 by Aleksej Saushev | Files touched by this commit (193)
Log message:
Drop superfluous PKG_DESTDIR_SUPPORT, "user-destdir" is default these days.
Mark packages that don't or might probably not have staged installation.
   2012-08-27 00:40:50 by Kamel Derouiche | Files touched by this commit (1) | Package updated
Log message:
Update Makefile

   2010-08-16 15:18:16 by Kamel Derouiche | Files touched by this commit (4) | Imported package
Log message:
Import lrslib-042b as wip/lrslib.

A convex polyhedron is the set of points satisfying a finite family of linear
inequalities.The study of the vertices and extreme rays of such systems is
important and useful in e.g. mathematics and optimization. In a dual
interpretation, finding the vertices of a (bounded) polyhedron is equivalent to
finding the convex hull (bounding inequalities) of an (arbitrary dimensional)
set of points. Lrs (lexicographic reverse search) has two important features
that can be very important for certain applications: it works in exact
arithmetic, and it consumes memory proportional to the input, no matter how
large the output is.