./textproc/zet, CLI utility to find the union, intersection, etc of files

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Branch: CURRENT, Version: 0.2.0, Package name: zet-0.2.0, Maintainer: pin

This is a command-line utility for doing set operations on files considered as
sets of lines. For instance, `zet union x y z` outputs the lines that occur in
any of `x`, `y`, or `z`.
Two notes:
-Each output line occurs only once, because we're treating the files as sets
and the lines as their elements.
-We do take the file structure into account in one respect: the lines are
output in the same order as they are encountered. So `zet union x` prints
out the lines of `x`, in order, with duplicates removed.


Master sites:

SHA1: a89303b75a304b7763c535c2fb12875783c641dc
RMD160: cd86274c463981725cd0d1c4cb09ecf6bcb0bc2d
Filesize: 22.062 KB

Version history: (Expand)


CVS history: (Expand)


   2021-08-05 10:58:31 by pin | Files touched by this commit (1)
Log message:
textproc/zet: simplify Makefile
   2021-07-05 10:45:08 by pin | Files touched by this commit (3) | Package updated
Log message:
textproc/zet: update to 0.2.0

-Add support for UTF-16 files, and make sure lines that differ only in their
terminator (\n vs \r\n) are considered equal.

-Zet looks for Byte Order Marks in UTF-8, UTF-16LE and UTF-16BE files,
translating UTF-16LE and UTF-16BE to UTF-8. It outputs a (UTF-8) Byte Order Mark
if and only if it finds one in its first file argument.
-Zet strips off the line terminator (\n or \r\n) from each input line. On
output, it uses the line terminator found in the first line of its first file
argument (or \n if the first file consists of a single line with no terminator).
   2021-06-15 09:27:31 by pin | Files touched by this commit (5)
Log message:
textproc/zet: import package

This is a command-line utility for doing set operations on files considered as
sets of lines. For instance, `zet union x y z` outputs the lines that occur in
any of `x`, `y`, or `z`.
Two notes:
-Each output line occurs only once, because we're treating the files as sets
 and the lines as their elements.
-We do take the file structure into account in one respect: the lines are
 output in the same order as they are encountered. So `zet union x` prints
 out the lines of `x`, in order, with duplicates removed.